Creative-Repertoire
Creative-Repertoire
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rashaka:

superseventies:

At home with Harrison Ford, 1978 

The only valid reason to time travel is to go back to the 1970’s and bang Harrison Ford. There is no other decent reason.  Fuck historical events! No, fuck Harrison Ford.
rashaka:

superseventies:

At home with Harrison Ford, 1978 

The only valid reason to time travel is to go back to the 1970’s and bang Harrison Ford. There is no other decent reason.  Fuck historical events! No, fuck Harrison Ford.
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newyorker:

Since 2010, Lisa Elmaleh has followed folk musicians from Ohio to Georgia, capturing them with her nineteen-forties Century Universal 8 x 10 camera and the hundred-and-fifty-year-old tintype process. A look at the portraits: http://nyr.kr/1A6mVvE
newyorker:

Since 2010, Lisa Elmaleh has followed folk musicians from Ohio to Georgia, capturing them with her nineteen-forties Century Universal 8 x 10 camera and the hundred-and-fifty-year-old tintype process. A look at the portraits: http://nyr.kr/1A6mVvE
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prettycolors:

#63849c
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magictransistor:

Nikola Tesla’s personal exhibition - Neon Lights (Columbian Exposition), 1893.
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moviesincolor:

Michel Gondry WeekMood Indigo, 2013Cinematography: Christophe Beaucarne
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flavorpill:

Flavorwire Interview: Michel Gondry on ‘Mood Indigo,’ ‘Eternal Sunshine,’ and a Dave Chappelle Reunion

Michel Gondry has always been a filmmaker who puts his own, unique stamp on his material, whether it’s romantic fantasy (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), buddy comedy (Be Kind Rewind), concert film (Dave Chappelle’s Block Party), or even a superhero flick (The Green Hornet). But his new film Mood Indigo, an adaptation of the fascinatingly multi-talented French writer Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L’écume des jours, may be his Gondry-est effort to date: charmingly whimsical and cheerfully inventive, filled with whirring gadgets and knockout visuals and gravity-defying dancing, with a healthy dose of lovelorn melancholy thrown in for good measure. I recently had the opportunity to chat with Mr. Gondry about Mood Indigo, as well as the legacy of Eternal Sunshine and his friendship with Dave Chappelle.
Flavorwire: Tell me a little bit about you and Boris Vian. When did you first come in contact with his work?
Michel Gondry:Well, when I was an adolescent, we didn’t have the Internet, and so we didn’t have access to the presentation of sexuality in the media, like there is now. So Boris Vian had written these books where he pretended he was just a translator, and the book was written by an American called Vernon Sullivan – and he actually wrote the books, but they were really racy, and they had a lot of sexual content. That was how most adolescents approached his writing, and by that time, we all knew that it was [really written by] Boris Vian. So those books had a lot of sexual elements to them, and we started to like the writer, and went to his other works.L’écume des jours–Mood Indigo– is the most famous of his books. And then I read most of his books after I readMood Indigo. So that’s how most adolescents, at least of my generation, came to know him. The generations after and before me, as well, all had a special relationship with him. He connects with adolescents and young adults like no other writer does.

READ MORE on Flavorwire
flavorpill:

Flavorwire Interview: Michel Gondry on ‘Mood Indigo,’ ‘Eternal Sunshine,’ and a Dave Chappelle Reunion

Michel Gondry has always been a filmmaker who puts his own, unique stamp on his material, whether it’s romantic fantasy (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), buddy comedy (Be Kind Rewind), concert film (Dave Chappelle’s Block Party), or even a superhero flick (The Green Hornet). But his new film Mood Indigo, an adaptation of the fascinatingly multi-talented French writer Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L’écume des jours, may be his Gondry-est effort to date: charmingly whimsical and cheerfully inventive, filled with whirring gadgets and knockout visuals and gravity-defying dancing, with a healthy dose of lovelorn melancholy thrown in for good measure. I recently had the opportunity to chat with Mr. Gondry about Mood Indigo, as well as the legacy of Eternal Sunshine and his friendship with Dave Chappelle.
Flavorwire: Tell me a little bit about you and Boris Vian. When did you first come in contact with his work?
Michel Gondry:Well, when I was an adolescent, we didn’t have the Internet, and so we didn’t have access to the presentation of sexuality in the media, like there is now. So Boris Vian had written these books where he pretended he was just a translator, and the book was written by an American called Vernon Sullivan – and he actually wrote the books, but they were really racy, and they had a lot of sexual content. That was how most adolescents approached his writing, and by that time, we all knew that it was [really written by] Boris Vian. So those books had a lot of sexual elements to them, and we started to like the writer, and went to his other works.L’écume des jours–Mood Indigo– is the most famous of his books. And then I read most of his books after I readMood Indigo. So that’s how most adolescents, at least of my generation, came to know him. The generations after and before me, as well, all had a special relationship with him. He connects with adolescents and young adults like no other writer does.

READ MORE on Flavorwire
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detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
detheo:

L’écume des jours, directed by Michel Gondry | trailer
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naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
naokosattomi:

L’écume des jours (Mood Indigo) | dir. Michel Gondry (2013)
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kidgarbage:

Mood Indigo (2014) Michel Gondry 
kidgarbage:

Mood Indigo (2014) Michel Gondry 
kidgarbage:

Mood Indigo (2014) Michel Gondry